Willard Hotel And Temperance References

1881,F13 SDU. Fall Brook planning to have Good Templars Lodge.

1881,M13 SDU. Fall Brook. Debate topic is "Resolved, 'that woman should have the same rights and privilages as man.'"

1881,D13 SDU. Good Templars have 17,000 members in California. The House for Orphans has built $5,000 schoolhouse. Six lecturers are in the field. Has weekly paper "The Rescue." Work to enforce the Sunday law. There is a Lodge and Band of Hope at San Luis Rey.

1883
April 9
. After speaking in San Diego, Willard left by train for the North (our train?)
Soon after, she spoke in LA; p.147, in San Francisco

1885,S24 SDU. Centennial Anniversary of Temperance Reformation in US is celebrated.

1885. Intl WCTU Convention, p 150

1885,Au20 FlbkRev. Churches and Societies: Fallbrook Lodge No. 270, IOGT meets every Sat eve at Abbott's Hall, 7:30, visitors invited.

1887,Jl15 SDU. Articles of Incorporation have been filed for Fallbrook Hotel Co. WMScott,11 shares, JAPruett&JWCheatham 10 shares ea, several larger and some smaller stockholders.

1887, March. (from 1931,N13 FE) WCTU formed

1887,O21 WFlbkRev. Shortage of lumber is causing delay in hotel building.

1889,Mr8 FlbkRev. Hotel Frances Willard, W.M Scott (over 50 rooms). costs $2 per day with special rates for families, W.M.Scott. One of businesses is millinery store operated by Mrs.J.W. Morrison (formerly owned by Mrs.A.O.Willard), who sold bonnets, plumes, and notions. It was located in the building recently occupied as a reading room. Two other women in business were Mrs.C.F.Crane, who was a dressmaker, and also the agent for Singer sewing machines, and Miss L.L.Wing, who dealt in ladies' furnishing goods. Miss Wing was also the superintendent of the temperance youth group. One of the Societies mentioned is I.O.G.T. (Lodge #270, Frank North, Geo. C.Abbott, Secy). Band of Hope meets at Baptist Church, Miss L.L.Wing, Supt. WCTU column (WCTU Society meets on alternate Wednesdays of the month.) It is written by Mrs. Fallis. Cheatham's column describes Fallbrook as a temperance town.

1889,Mr22 FlbkRev. Rev. Geo. Morris of Prohibition Party will speak in Flbk. Ed.(VanVelzer) is selling book of "Prohibition Melodies" for $.35 ea; just received from music publisher, John J. Hood in Philadelphia.

1889,S6 FlbkRev. There are 83 Unions (WCTU) in San Diego County. Horace Bradt of San Diego is sellingColumbia Bicycles and Tricycles. Bicycle tournament leaves LA Wednesday and will arrive Fallbrook Friday noon and have dinner here; 20 in party.

1889,S13 FlbkRev. Column on WCTU reg meetings. Originally called the Fallbrook Union

1889,N22 FlbkRev. Miss Willard donates to the WCTU the balance due on her new book, $2,900.

1895,Mr26 SDU. GAWillard (any relation?) of Oakland, father of Mrs. FFAdams, is visiting daughter at Red Mt Ranch and looking afgter business interests in SouthCalif. 1898, death of Francis Willard

1911,Mr24 FE. WCTU meets first Tuesday at home of Mrs. Marguerite Burr (Vine and Ivy). Among members are Mrs. Mary Gird Peters, Mrs Mary Jbrandon, Mrs Belle Clark, Mrs. Winnie Pittenger.

1916,Ja7 FE. Mrs. Henry Morrison does dressmaking. Mrs. C.C.Wheeler sells Victor records at one third off regular price for cash. Dr. Annie R. Watkins, the widely known woman dentist is again in Fallbrook at Hotel Ellis until Jan 12. Mrs. Crane is Press Supt. of WCTU, which meets at Woman's Club rooms at 2PM on third Fri of month. Fallbrook is the original"dry" town in this part of the State, not having had a saloon for 20 years.


Francis E. Willard was the first woman college president in the U.S. (Evanston College, 1874). She became president of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and expanded its activities to include women's voting rights and other reforms. Under the banner "Home Protection" Willard led 200,000 women into political involvement. She was president of the National Council of Women and of the World WCTU.


There were also men who supported the temperance movement. One of these was May Van Velzer's husband, Gilbert. He was always for the "common man" against special privilege. He had come from work on a paper in Jewell County, Kansas, which was dedicated to ridding the county of Graft. Here he also joined a "Good Templar Lodge" and met other young people who were fighting the evils of the liquor traffic. He was 17 when Kansas adopted Prohibition. VV voted the Prohibition ticket until 1896, when he voted for William Jennings Bryan.


There were also men who supported the temperance movement. One of these was May Van Velzer's husband, Gilbert, the newspaper editor. Always the crusader against special privilege, he was active in Fallbrook's Good Templar's Lodge. This Lodge was a temperance organization which preceded both the Masonic and the Odd Fellows groups in Fallbrook.

A modern researcher into the temperance movement was Floyd Markham, one of the Historical Society's early board members. He was fascinated by Fallbrook's resort hotel, and spent a great deal of time researching the name and the movement and the hotel's visitors. He also spent countless hours visiting archives and gathering local materials, all of which he donated to the Historical Society.

I personally benefited from his experience. When I came back to Fallbrook in 1981, after an absence of 35 years, it was Floyd who took me to the best sources and who shared all he had learned. This exhibit on Fallbrook's distinguished women would not have been possible without his pioneering efforts.

Liz Yamaguchi


This is the 1987 poster for National Women's History Month.

1987 Poster chosen because it has a special distinguished woman Frances E. Willard

Look at Fallbrook's Resort Hotel; other names; first name

In 1881, 4 years before Fallbrook became a town, there were 17,000 members of the Good Templars Lodge in CA - this was a temperance org. At Reche School, the debate topic was "Resolved, that woman should have the same rights and privileges as man.

Flbk WCTU was organized in 1887, the same year the Willard hotel was built. In March of that year, a representative of the Prohibition Party spoke in FLBK. In the same month, the local paper was selling a book of "Prohibition melodies".

Francis E. Willard was the first woman college president in the U.S. (Evanston College, 1874). She became president of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and expanded its activities to include women's voting rights and other reforms. Under the banner "Home Protection" Willard led 200,000 women into political involvement. She was president of the National Council of Women and of the World WCTU.


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Comments and feedback: Elizabeth Yamaguchi
Last update: 25 December 1998.