Highlighted Instructions For The Use Of The Table Containing Peak Parameters

The table of Distances, Azimuths and Elevation Angles Of Peaks can be a bit confusing to use. This page gives examples in the use of the table by highlighting different parts of the table.

To use this table,

look down the first column
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

to find the official peak name on which you are standing:
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

Each peak has three entries in that column, the official name highlighted just above, the county in which the peak is located, and
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

the name of the 7.5' USGS Topographic map on which the peak is located.
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

To find the observed parameters of a given peak, stay within the same set of rows and go to the column containing

the peak named at the top of each column.
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

The rows corresponding to that entry give the observed distance (in miles),
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

the azimuth (in degrees), and
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

the elevation angle (in degrees)
   San Gabriel Peak Mount Disappointment 
 
San Gabriel Peak   0.4 
Los Angeles   302.3 
Mount Wilson   -5.1 
 

The azimuthal angle is the direction in which you need to look in order to see the observed peak. Angles of 0 = north, 90 = east, 180 = south and 270 = west. The elevation angle is the distance above (positive) or below (negative) the horizon at which you'll find the observed peak.

Here's an exercise to make sure you understand how to use the table:

If you are standing on Mt. Wilson, go to the third row of the table. The entries there say that Mt. Wilson is located in Los Angeles County on the topo map called Mt. Wilson. The first column to the right gives the observed parameters of San Gabriel Peak. Its distance from Mt. Wilson is 2.5 miles, its azimuth is 302.3°, which is 32.3° north of due west, and its elevation angle is 1.9°. The next column gives the parameters for Mt. Disappointment. Because the azimuth of Mt. Disappointment is exactly the same as for San Gabriel Peak, and the distance to Mt. Disappointment is greater, Mt. Disappointment is directly behind San Gabriel Peak. Since the elevation angle is a full degree lower, Mt. Disappointment cannot be seen behind San Gabriel Peak.

The unhappiness registered by government surveyors in 1875 after they lugged their equipment up to Mt. Disappointment and found that San Gabriel Peak was higher led directly to the name.

If you did not get the correct results by reading the table yourself, see Further Highlighted Instructions For The Use Of The Table Containing Peak Parameters.


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Copyright © 1998-1999 by Tom Chester and Jane Strong.
Permission is freely granted to reproduce any or all of this page as long as credit is given to us at this source:
http://tchester.org/sgm/analysis/peaks/view_params_explained.html
Comments and feedback: Tom Chester | Jane Strong
Last update: 15 April 1999.