The Flora of the PCT
San Ysidro Mountains B5, Tule Canyon Truck Trail - Highway 74

Fig. 1. Top left: Allophyllum glutinosum, sticky false-gilia. The stalked glands, made of sticky goo, is the source of the common name. Note the distinctive exserted curved stamens. Top right: Delphinium parryi ssp. parryi, blue larkspur. Bottom: cottonwoods, Populus fremontii, in Nance Canyon, a desert-side drainage crossed by the PCT at about mile 3.1.
Top pictures taken on 14 May 2009 by Tom Chester on the PCT south of Highway 74. Bottom picture taken by RT Hawke from just north of Nance Canyon on the PCT on 15 March 2014. Click on the pictures for larger versions.

SegmentSegment StartSegment EndSegment LengthElevation (feet)
MinMaxRange
B5Tule Canyon Truck Trail, 3620 feetHighway 74, 4920 feet15.0 miles333050601730
This section covers roughly mile 137 to mile 152 from the Mexican Border by our count and by Halfmile's count (mile 138 to 154 using the PCT Data Book; see notes on accuracy of mileages).
Topo! gives 14.3 miles for this segment. The PCT Data Book gives 15.4 miles. We've adopted 15.0 miles.
The one-way hike from south to north has a total elevation gain of 2585 feet, and a total elevation loss of 1285 feet see the profile below.
The one-way hike from north to south has a total elevation gain of 1285 feet, and a total elevation loss of 2585 feet.
A round-trip hike of this section is 30.0 miles, with an elevation gain and loss of 3870 feet.

Introduction
Survey Dates
The Trail Plant Checklist

Introduction

See The Flora of the Pacific Crest Trail: Overview for an Introduction to these plant checklists, and B. The San Ysidro and San Jacinto Mountains for an Introduction to the San Ysidro and San Jacinto Mountains section.

This section of the trail continues to undulate through the chaparral, with great views of the Santa Rosa Mountains, and views down Coyote Canyon to the Anza-Borrego desert. Aside from plants, geology is the most spectacular part of this trail. You get to walk through the San Jacinto fault, the most active fault of California. It appears to be a least a quarter mile wide in places. Highway 74 marks the end of the San Ysidro Mountains, and the beginning of the San Jacinto Mountains.

 

Fig. 2. Left: Trail Map for the PCT Section B5, Tule Canyon Truck Trail - Highway 74, from USDA Forest Service Interactive Map. Right: Elevation profile from B5, Tule Canyon Truck Trail - Highway 74, from south to north. Click on the pictures for larger versions.

Survey Dates

DateSurveyors# Species known on trail
cumulative from all surveys to date
15 March 2014RT and Shaun Hawke136

In addition, six surveys have been done for the four mile subsection going south from Highway 74. The merger of those surveys and the survey of the entire section have a total of 229 taxa.

The Trail Plant Checklist

The Plant Checklist for the entire section is currently available in three different formats:

Separate condensed print versions of just the checklist names are available for all except for the Calflora thumbnail picture version.

See also the plant trail guide for the four mile subsection going south from Highway 74.


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Copyright © 2016 by RT Hawke, Shaun Hawke, Tom Chester, and Dave Stith
Permission is freely granted to reproduce any or all of this page as long as credit is given to us at this source:
http://tchester.org/pct/b/b5_tule_rd_SR74.html
Comments and feedback: Tom Chester
Updated 10 January 2016.